New York Times information on Mongolia

Mongolia is the world’s least densely populated country, with 2.9 million people spread across an area three times the size of France, two-fifths in rural areas on windswept steppes.

Landlocked between Russia and China, Mongolia contains vast troves of natural resources like coal, copper and gold that have attracted intense interest from mining giants around the world and turned the nation into a pawn in a global game involving China, the United States and Russia. Washington has lauded the country for its smooth transition from Soviet satellite to thriving democracy.

General Information on Mongolia

Official Name: Mongolia
Capital: Ulaanbaatar
Government Type: Mixed parliamentary/presidential
Population: 2.952 million
Area: 604,103 square miles; slightly larger than Alaska
Languages: Khalkha Mongol (primarily ), Turkic, Russian
Literacy: Total Population: [98%] Male: [98%]; Female: [98%]
GDP Per Capita: $2,100
Year of Independence: 1921

http://topics.nytimes.com/top/news/international/countriesandterritories/mongolia/index.html?8qa

Slideshow: “The Downturn Reaches a Mongolian Goat Farm”

 

(click on the images to go to the NYTimes website to view the entire
slideshow and read the captions that go along with each photo)

Slideshow: “Inner Mongolia’s Field Hockey Players”

For 1,000 years, the Daur people of Molidawa, in Inner Mongolia, have been playing a game called beikou. The game is similar to field hockey and entails whacking around a ball-like knob of apricot root with long wooden branches.

A local cultural organization holds beikou matches. Two dozen or so players assemble and put on their traditional uniforms: boots, silk pantaloons, long silk robes belted with a sash, and a Daur hat that looks a little like a bishop’s miter.
Eight schools in the area teach hockey starting in the third grade. The best students are admitted to a select hockey development program in Molidawa.
(click on the images to go to the NYTimes website to view the entire
slideshow and read the captions that go along with each photo)

“Mongolia Navigator”

A list of resources from around the Web about Mongolia as selected by researchers and editors of The New York Times.

Links:

NY Times profile of Mongolia

NY Times search results for “Mongolia”

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